1. Local Maps with Canvas + D3

    In conjunction with the more generalized topic of data visualization, mapping on the web continues to become more and more feature-rich. There’s no shortage of great APIs out there to bring a bit of cartography to your site, but you’ll occasionally need something with a bit more local or personalized flair.

    Nick Walsh Nick Walsh
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  2. Meet Envy: Tyler Hunt

    In this ongoing series, the Envy blog is showing what makes our team the best in the industry. From designers to developers to support staff, we want you to get to know our amazing team, what makes them tick and hear why they’re so passionate about their work and role at Envy. You’ve already met Ayana Campbell, Nate Bibler, Drew Powers, and Nick Walsh. This month’s team member spotlight is Developer Tyler Hunt.

    Jason VanLue Jason VanLue
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  3. Tips for Design Students Entering the Workforce

    Ayana Campbell Ayana Campbell
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  4. Meet Envy: Nick Walsh

    In this ongoing series, the Envy blog is showing what makes our team the best in the industry. From designers to developers to support staff, we want you to get to know our amazing team, what makes them tick and hear why they’re so passionate about their work and role at Envy. You’ve already met Ayana Campbell, Nate Bibler, and Drew Powers. This month’s team member spotlight is Design Director Nick Walsh.

    Jason VanLue Jason VanLue
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  5. Discovery Meetings: Distilling Complex Software into a Plan

    Something magical happens in the time between saying, “I have an idea for an app,” and the product’s launch. The transformation of ideas into something real, or the enterprise of creation where we bring thoughts into existence, is what I love about my job. But if you’ve been doing this for any length of time, you know how hard this process is. With alarming regularity, software projects get derailed due to scope creep, unmet expectations, and miscommunication. At Envy, we try with relentless tenacity to eliminate these derailments, and one of most powerful tools we use is implemented at the beginning of every project: the Discovery Meeting.

    Tim Dikun Tim Dikun
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  6. Cancel Your Confirmations

    We hate confirmation boxes. In a web app, a JavaScript confirm box is jarring, unstylable, and worse yet, it nearly-always appears in a distant location from where the user is focused on the page. Most often these confirm boxes show up just before something destructive happens in a vain attempt to show your user that you care and don’t want something bad to happen.

    Nathaniel Bibler Nathaniel Bibler
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  7. In CSS, the Only Wrong Answers are Definitive Ones

    Earlier this week, simurai released a poignant post detailing the struggle of handling contextual styles within CSS components. While the contents of his essay are excellent in their own right, the admission that a clear winner doesn’t exist made the biggest impression.

    Nick Walsh Nick Walsh
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  8. Meet Envy: Drew Powers

    In this ongoing series, the Envy blog is showing what makes our team the best in the industry. From designers to developers to support staff, we want you to get to know our amazing team, what makes them tick and hear why they’re so passionate about their work and role at Envy. You’ve been introduced to one of our great designers, Ayana Campbell, and last month, we spoke with co-founder of Envy and Development Director Nate Bibler. This month’s team member spotlight is designer Drew Powers.

    Jason VanLue Jason VanLue
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  9. Ember Components and WAI-ARIA

    As developers, we are often encouraged to make our web applications “accessible”. But what does that mean? What makes our applications “inaccessible” in the first place? Here’s what the W3C has to say on the matter:

    Dray Lacy Dray Lacy
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  10. Mocking ActiveRecord with ActiveMocker

    When testing Rails applications, two of the most significant performance bottlenecks are accessing the database and loading Rails itself. RSpec Mocks and other mocking frameworks give us the tools to avoid these bottlenecks by allowing us to mock our Rails models, but doing so can be tedious.

    Matt Schultz Matt Schultz
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